Cross section of the Colosseum

The Colosseum, also known as the Flavio Amphitheater (built between 72-80 AD), is divided into several different sections:The Arena: This is the central stage of the Colosseum where the actual events took place. It was a wooden floor covered in sand, to absorb the blood of fighting, and could be reconfigured to house a variety of spectacles, including gladiator combat and naval battle drills.Secrets of an Ancient Arena

Hypogeia: Beneath the arena lies hypogeia, a complex network of tunnels and underground cameras. It harbored gladiators, prisoners and animals before being lifted to the sand floor through traps.The hypogeus contained sophisticated machinery and was a boiler of activity during the shows.Cavea (seating stands): The seating arrangement in the Colosseum was strictly in accordance with the social classification:Podium: The area closest to the arena, reserved for the most prestigious spectators, such as senators, nobles and the emperor.Archaeology - Roman Civilization. Reconstruction of Rome Colosseum, built AD 70-82, Stock Photo, Picture And Rights Managed Image. Pic. DAE-15010736 | agefotostock

– Maenianum Primum: the level above the podium for rich citizens.-Maenianum Secundum: Divided into two parts, the lower part (immum) was for the common Roman citizens (plebeians) and the upper part (summum) for the poorest, foreigners and enslaved citizens.Maenianum Secundum in Legneis: The wooden structure at the highest where women and the lower classes could see the events

Cross-section of the seating area of the Colosseum in Rome

The Vomits: They were the entry and exit hallways that allowed large crowds to enter and exit the Colosseum efficiently.The Velarium: It was a retractable canopy that provided shade and protected spectators from Roman sun and rain.The higher levels: Above the general seats there were additional levels that included:The Portico: a column on the upper level from where ordinary people could watch the games.The Maenianum Tertium: the living zone for low-class women and very poor people.Each section was meticulously designed to fulfill its purpose, from showcasing the grandeur of Roman architecture and engineering to ensuring social hierarchy was maintained even during entertainment.