Head of Apollo crowned with laurels unearthed

March 29, 2024

Head of Apollo crowned with laurels unearthed

A head dated to the 2nd or early 3rd century AD belonging to a beardless man crowned with a wreath of laurels, most likely belonging to a statue of Apollo, was among the finds made by Aristotle University researchers at the Philippi archeological site in northeastern Greece during excavations completed last September, according to the Culture Ministry.

Image of Marble head of the god of Arts Apollo, crowned with by Roman, (1st-4th century AD)

The excavations continued east of the southern main street (decumanus) at the point where it meets the northern axis of the city (the Via Egnatia), revealing part of a square dominated by a richly decorated building. A coin featuring Byzantine Emperor Leo VI (886-912), found on a stretch of marble-paved road, helped determine the duration of its use. The ministry said statues from the Classical and Roman periods adorned buildings and public spaces in Byzantine cities including Philippi. Founded in 356 BC, Philippi lies on an ancient route linking Europe and Asia, the Via Egnatia.

Image of Marble head of the god of Arts Apollo, crowned with by Roman, (1st-4th century AD)