Marine archaeologists examining a colossal marble head of the Greco-Egyptian god Serapis at Thonis-Herakleion, Egypt.

More than 1,200 years ago, two cities on Egypt’s north coast disappeared into the Mediterranean Sea, victims of rising tides and seismic disruption. Beginning in 1991 underwater excavations have brought a staggering array of artifacts to the surface which have fundamentally changed our understanding of the ancient Egyptian coastal region. The Sunken Cities: Egypt’s Lost Worlds audio guide features a general introduction and expert commentary on 10 works from the exhibition and 3 additional colossal sculptures.

Stop 1

Stele of Thonis-Heracleion

Thonis-Heracleion, 380 BC

Sunken Cities: Egypt's Lost Worlds - Saint Louis Art MuseumStele of Thonis-Heracleion (detail), Thonis-Heracleion, Aboukir Bay, Egypt; Late Period, 30th Dynasty, in the reign of Nectanebo I (380-362 BC); black granodiorite; height: 74 13/16 inches; National Museum of Alexandria (SCA 277); IEASM Excavations; Photo: Christoph Gerigk © Franck Goddio / Hilti Foundation

 

Stop 3

Naos of Amun-Gereb

Thonis-Heracleion, c.322-120 BC

Sunken Cities: Egypt's Lost Worlds - Saint Louis Art MuseumNaos of the temple of Amun-Gereb (detail), Thonis-Heracleion, Ptolemaic period (332-30 BC); red granite; 68 1/2 × 36 5/8 × 39 3/8 inches, weight: 6300 lb.; Maritime Museum of Alexandria (SCA 457); IEASM Excavations; Photo: Christoph Gerigk © Franck Goddio / Hilti Foundation

 

Stop 6

The Mysteries of Osiris

Sunken Cities: Egypt's Lost Worlds - Saint Louis Art MuseumOsiris Vegetans Figure in a Falcon-headed Coffin, c.800–600 BC; Egyptian; Third Intermediate period, 1069–664 BC; sarcophagus: sycamore wood, figurine: earth and grain; 6 5/16 × 9 13/16 × 23 5/8 inches; Egyptian Museum, Cairo (JE36539); Photo: Christoph Gerigk © Franck Goddio / Hilti Foundation