Roman bird-shaped glass vessels were used as perfume bottles.

Roman bird-shaped glass vessels were used as perfume bottles. The liquid was sealed inside the vessels and the tip of the tail had to be broken to remove the perfume. The one pictured (c. 1st century AD) is still intact and filled with the scented content.

Translucent pale blue green.
Long, solid, rounded beak; head projecting forward and slightly downward, attached to tubular neck that merges with plump body.


Broken, with back part of body and tail missing; few bubbles; dulling and faint iridescence on exterior, creamy iridescent weathering covering interior with one patch of limy encrustation.

Bottles of this type were made with their contents (either liquid perfume or cosmetic powder) sealed inside. The tip of the tail had thus to be broken to remove the contents.