The Hawara “Black Pyramid” in Egypt conceals a highly significant complex known as the lost Labyrinth of Hawara.

The Hawara “Black Pyramid” in Egypt conceals a highly significant complex known as the lost Labyrinth of Hawara.
Notably, while the pyramid is constructed using small bricks, the entrance to the Labyrinth is remarkably megalithic (see Picture 3).
Có thể là hình ảnh về Tượng Nhân sư ở Giza
Herodotus, an ancient historian, visited this complex and described it before it faded into historical obscurity. He depicted it as an incomparable masterpiece that surpassed the collective efforts and expenses of the Greeks, even overshadowing the awe-inspiring pyramids.
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Within the sacred enclosure, a temple with forty columns on each side greeted visitors. The temple’s roof, crafted from a single stone, showcased intricate carved panels.
The Labyrinth comprised twelve covered courts, with six gates facing each other on both the northern and southern sides. These courts were adorned with perfectly fitted pillars made of white stone.
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The Labyrinth housed three thousand chambers, divided into two types: underground and above-ground chambers.
At the heart of the Labyrinth stood a forty-fathom-high pyramid adorned with grand carved figures. It contained an underground passage.
Herodotus’ account can be found in Historiae, Book II, page 148.
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In the 17th century, the German scholar A. Kircher created a depiction of the Labyrinth based on Herodotus’ description (see Picture 4).
Initially dismissed as a myth, the existence of the Labyrinth was eventually confirmed.
In 2008, Belgian and Egyptian researchers used ground-penetrating technology to investigate the site, successfully confirming the presence of an underground complex.
The findings were published in the scientific journal of the NRIAG and presented in a public lecture at the University of Gent, Belgium.
Unfortunately, further communication about the discovery was halted due to Egyptian National Security sanctions imposed by the Secretary-General of the Supreme Council of Antiquities.
As of today, the site remains unexcavated.